• Español
  • English

Accueil > Notice complète

  • Première page
  • Page précédente
  • Notice 1 sur 1
  • Page suivante
  • Dernière page

Notice complète

1/1
Mass spectrometry and its applications to organic chemistry
Auteur :
Beynon, John Herbert  
Éditeur :
Elsevier  
London, New York [etc.]  
Lieu de publication :
Amsterdam  
Date de publication :
1960  
Langue :
anglais  
Sujet :
Chimie analytique  
Composés organiques  
Spectrométrie de masse  
Isotopes  
Type de document :
Livre  

Université de Bordeaux

Bibliothèque Localisation Statut Condition Vol. Cote
ST-BU SC. ET TECHNIQUES Magasin Accueil niveau 0 Disponible Prêtable C 4734
Collation :
1 vol. (XII-640 p.) ; ill. ; 25 cm  
Provenance :
Abes (PPN005759234)  
Notes :
Réimpressions : 1964, 1967, 1968. Bibliogr. p. 585-629. Index  
Origine :
BaBord  
Identifiant d'origine :
70336  

P.
4.
Chapter 1.
Instruments.
P.
4.
1.1 Focussing.
P.
4.
1.2 The parabola spectrograph.
P.
5.
1.3 Velocity focussing.
P.
5.
1.4 Direction focussing.
P.
8.
1.5 The sector magnetic field.
P.
11.
1.6 The velocity selector.
P.
11.
1.7 Double focussing.
P.
15.
1.8 Methods of improving performance.
P.
16.
1.9 The trochoidal-path mass spectrometer.
P.
19.
1.10 Time-of-flight mass spectrometers using a magnetic field.
P.
23.
1.11 Linear path time-of-flight mass spectrometers.
P.
26.
1.12 Miscellaneous instruments.
P.
27.
1.13 Instruments for isotope separation.
P.
28.
Chapter 2.
The measurement of mass.
P.
28.
2.1 The physical and chemical mass scales.
P.
30.
2.2 Accurate methods of mass measurement.
P.
33.
2.3 Errors in the determination of mass by mass spectroscopy.
P.
38.
2.4 Technique with a general purpose instrument and the attainable accuracy.
P.
43.
2.5 The determination of mass number : magnetic field measurement.
P.
48.
2.6 Packing fractions of the isotopes.
P.
49.
2.7 Mass doublets and mass differences.
P.
51.
2.8 Definitions of resolving power.
P.
54.
2.9 Mass measurement in analysis.
P.
58.
Chapter 3.
The measurement of ionic abundance.
P.
58.
3.1 Introduction.
P.
59.
3.2 Possible errors in the measurement of relative abundance.
P.
70.
3.3 Stable isotopes as tracers.
P.
71.
3.4 Determination of deuterium in organic compounds.
P.
77.
3.5 Determination of 18 O in organic compounds.
P.
79.
3.6 Determination of 15 N in organic compounds.
P.
81.
3.7 Determination of 13 C in organic compounds.
P.
81.
3.8 Determination of the isotopic abundances of other elements.
P.
83.
3.9 Detection of small changes in abundance ratio.
P.
88.
3.10 Variations in the natural abundance ratios of the elements.
P.
95.
3.11 The detection of rare isotopes.
P.
98.
3.12 Isotopic dilution.
P.
103.
Chapter 4.
Sources of positive ions.
P.
103.
4.1 Introduction.
P.
103.
4.2 The electron-bombardement ion source.
P.
111.
4.3 The surface ionization source.
P.
115.
4.4 The vacuum spark ion source.
P.
117.
4.5 The photo-ionization source.
P.
120.
4.6 The field-emission source.
P.
123.
4.7 Other types of ion source.
P.
124.
Chapter 5.
Sample handling.
P.
124.
5.1 The flow conditions in the mass spectrometer.
P.
126.
5.2 Thermal transpiration.
P.
126.
5.3 The construction of leaks.
P.
132.
5.4 The vaccum system.
P.
133.
(i) Materials of construction.
P.
138.
(ii) Demountable connections and vacuum valves.
P.
144.
5.5 The choice of method of sample introduction.
P.
145.
5.6 Estimation of sample volatility.
P.
147.
5.7 The introduction of gases and volatile liquid samples.
P.
161.
5.8 The introduction of less volatile samples.
P.
172.
5.9 Other analytical information obtainable by mass spectrometry.
P.
174.
5.10 Special problems concerned with mixtures.
P.
178.
5.11 The examination of small amounts of sample.
P.
184.
5.12 Sample system for general use.
P.
186.
5.13 Examination and separation of samples by auxiliary techniques.
P.
187.
(i) Gas-liquid chromatography.
P.
191.
(ii) Zone melting.
P.
195.
Chapter 6.
The recording of positive ions beams.
P.
195.
6.1 Introduction.
P.
195.
6.2 Photographic detection.
P.
197.
6.3 Electrical detectors.
P.
197.
(i) Single collectors.
P.
201.
(ii) Multiple collectors.
P.
203.
6.4 Signal-to-noise ratio in simple collecting systems.
P.
206.
6.5 Multiplier detectors.
P.
214.
6.6 Some uses of multipler detectors.
P.
217.
6.7 Fluctuations in gain of a multiplier.
P.
219.
6.8 The recorder.
P.
234.
6.9 The recording of derivatives.
P.
238.
Chapter 7.
Types of ions in mass spectra.
P.
238.
7.1 Introduction.
P.
239.
7.2 Total ionization.
P.
240.
7.3 "Parent" or molecular ions.
P.
242.
7.4 Fragment ions.
P.
251.
7.5 Meta-stable ions.
P.
262.
7.6 Re-arrangement ions.
P.
275.
7.7 Ions formed by intermolecular processes.
P.
282.
7.8 Multiply-charged ions.
P.
284.
7.9 Ions formed with kinetic energy.
P.
286.
7.10 Negative ions.
P.
291.
Chapter 8.
Qualitative analysis by mass spectrometer.
P.
291.
8.1 Introduction.
P.
293.
8.2 Compounds to wich the method can be applied.
P.
294.
8.3 The compilation of a table of mass and abundance values.
P.
302.
8.4 The determination of molecular formulae of organic substances by mass measurement.
P.
305.
8.5 The determination of molecular formulae of organic substances by isotopic abundance measurement.
P.
306.
8.6 Errors caused by interference from other ions.
P.
307.
8.7 Methods of distinguishing "parent" ions.
P.
312.
8.8 The uses of exact formulae in analysis.
P.
313.
8.9 The listing of structural formulae from an exact molecular formula.
P.
319.
8.10 Analysis of mixtures.
P.
323.
8.11 The determination of molecular weight by effusion.
P.
325.
Chapter 9.
Correlations of molecular structure and mass spectra.
P.
325.
9.1 Aliphatic hydrocarbons.
P.
340.
9.2 Alkylbenzenes.
P.
345.
9.3 Monohydric alcohols and phenols.
P.
354.
9.4 Ketones.
P.
361.
9.5 Aldehydes.
P.
362.
9.6 Ethers.
P.
371.
9.7 Carboxylic acids.
P.
375.
9.8 Esters.
P.
387.
9.9 Amines and other saturated nitrogen-containing compounds.
P.
396.
9.10 Amides.
P.
397.
9.11 Indoles, pyrroles, quinolines and pyridines.
P.
404.
9.12 Nitriles.
P.
406.
9.13 Nitro-compounds and nitrites.
P.
409.
9.14 Nitroso-derivatives and nitrosamines.
P.
410.
9.15 Sulphur compounds.
P.
413.
9.16 Halogenated compounds.
P.
421.
9.17 Silicon compounds.
P.
422.
9.18 Other compounds.
P.
423.
9.19 General remarks.
P.
424.
Other applications of mass spectrometry.
P.
424.
10.1 Mass spectrometry in the petroleum industry : quantitative analysis.
P.
424.
(i) Introduction.
P.
424.
(ii) Simple mixtures.
P.
426.
(iii) Multi-component mixtures.
P.
428.
(iv) Limitations to the attainable accuracy.
P.
428.
(v) Variation of cracking pattern.
P.
431.
(vi) Interference of one sample with another.
P.
432.
10.2 Identification of reaction products.
P.
440.
10.3 The study of the interactions of ions with matter.
P.
443.
10.4 The separation of isotopes.
P.
443.
(i) The calutron.
P.
443.
(ii) Separation by diffusion.
P.
444.
(iii) Separation by distillation.
P.
445.
(iv) Separation by chemical exchange.
P.
446.
(v) Separation by electrolysis.
P.
446.
(vi) Other separation methods.
P.
446.
10.5 The uses in physics of separated isotopes.
P.
448.
10.6 Isotopic age determination.
P.
453.
10.7 Determination of the mechanisms and rates of reactions : isotope effects.
P.
459.
10.8 The measurement of latent heats of vaporization and sublimation.
P.
474.
10.9 The measurement of latent heats of vaporization and sublimation.
P.
479.
10.10 Leak detection.
P.
482.
10.11 High vacuum problems.
P.
483.
10.12 Miscellaneous applications.
P.
486.
Appendixes.
P.
486.
Appendix 1.
Masses and isotopic abundance ratios for various combinations of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen.
P.
546.
Appendix 2.
Nomograms for determination of the origin of meta-stable ions.
P.
554.
Appendix 3.
Table of the masses and abundances of the naturally-occurring isotopes.
P.
570.
Appendix 4.
International atomic weights (1955).
P.
572.
Appendix 5.
Possible peaks in the mass spectra of fluorocarbons and their composition.
P.
578.
Appendix 6.
The mass spectrum of fluorolube residues (above mass 69).
P.
582.
Appendix 7.
Somme common mass doublets

Il n'y a pas de commentaire pour cette notice.

  • Première page
  • Page précédente
  • Notice 1 sur 1
  • Page suivante
  • Dernière page